On Sale Now!

 

Join My Fan Page

Ginger Campbell, MD
Ginger Campbell, MD



Search This Site
Recommended Sites

      Hear Jake's Story

 

Powered by Squarespace
« Latest Brain Science Podcast looks at Brain-Machine Interfaces | Main | Neurobiology of Placebos with Fabrizio Benedetti (BSP 77) »
Tuesday
Sep272011

Cognitive Dissonance with Carol Tavris, PhD (Books and Ideas #43)

Carol Tavris, PhD Click for audioThe theory of cognitive dissonance is not new but Mistakes Were Made (But Not by Me): Why We Justify Foolish Beliefs, Bad Decisions, and Hurtful Acts by Carol Tavris and Elliot Aronson makes cognitive dissonance accessible to everyone, and, more importantly, Tavris and Aronson make it clear why we should care. As Dr. Tavris explained in a recent interview (Books and Ideas #43), "cognitive dissonance is a theory of blind spots." Appreciating how our brains automatically strive to decrease the discomfort we feel when faced with conflicting beliefs, can help us become aware of how these blind spots effect our behavior and attitudes.

listen-to-audio-20 Listen to Episode 43 of Books and Ideas

Episode Transcript (Download PDF)

Subscribe to Books and Ideas Podcast: itunes-badge-30 feed-icon32x32 zunelogo-70 mail-sticker-tiny

Cognitive dissonance is also revelevant to anyone with an interest in science because as Dr. Tavris noted: "the scientific method is designed to create dissonance—in a way, we could say this.  This is one of the reasons science is so unpopular—I should say is so difficult—because scientists are humans, and scientists don’t like it when their predictions are disconfirmed.  But, you see, as we now understand, the mind is designed for consistency, for consonance; it’s designed to notice, and remember, and confirm evidence that supports our beliefs, and to forget and ignore information that is dissonant with our beliefs.

It’s such an interesting thing for those of us interested in skepticism and science, because the scientific method is designed to create dissonance—in a way, we could say this.  This is one of the reasons science is so unpopular—I should say is so difficult—because scientists are humans, and scientists don’t like it when their predictions are disconfirmed.  But, you see, as we now understand, the mind is designed for consistency, for consonance; it’s designed to notice, and remember, and confirm evidence that supports our beliefs, and to forget and ignore information that is dissonant with our beliefs."

Links and References

Listener donations help make Dr. Campbell's podcasts possible. 

Announcements

 

 

listen-to-audio-20 Listen to Episode 43 of Books and Ideas

Episode Transcript (Download PDF)

Subscribe to Books and Ideas Podcast: itunes-badge-30 feed-icon32x32 zunelogo-70 mail-sticker-tiny